For the Active Ones

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Athletes and active people are really on the highway to good health and there are several benefits to being active – some of which you may not even have known about.

Benefits of exercise: (1)

  • Keeps the weight down – Being active regularly and doing healthy exercise, prevents those rolls from rolling over your pants, if you are active, you burn energy, and the more intense the more you burn.
  • Keeps health conditions and diseases at bay – Through regular exercise you can boost your body’s high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or “good” cholesterol level and decrease unhealthy triglycerides. By keeping your blood flowing smoothly through your body you are improving your heart health. It also helps prevent a wide range of health problems and concerns, like depression, metabolic syndrome and diabetes.
  • Keeps you happier – A brisk 30-min walk or a session at the gym could help you blow off some steam after a stressful day. Physical activity stimulates various chemicals in your brain that helps you feel happier and more relaxed. Doing regular exercise also helps improve your self-image and boost your level of confidence as you will feel better about your appearance.
  • Keeps you energised – The more regularly you exercise, the more energy you will have to carry on doing it and for doing other things in your everyday life as well. Regular exercise will make you fit and strong enough to not get so winded when you carry those heavy bags from the shop to your car. It builds endurance and muscle strength. Because it delivers oxygen and nutrients faster to your body tissues your heart and lungs will work better, resulting in you having more energy – for everything!
  • Keep a better sleep routine – When you are active, you will find it easier to fall asleep at night and to experience deep sleep. You will also feel more willing to get up in the morning. Just don’t exercise too close to bedtime (around 2 hours) or you may be too buzzed from your jazz class to fall asleep.
  • Keeps you both happy – Doing regular exercise will help you keep your relationship flame burning the midnight oil. Regular physical activity can improve energy levels and physical appearance, which may boost your performance. Exercise enhances arousal for women and men who don’t exercise are more likely to experience erectile dysfunction than their active counterparts.
  • Keeps you connected – Exercise can be a fun and social way to unwind, enjoy the outdoors and to connect with family and friends. It is a great way to meet new people – so try something new, or introduce something familiar (like walking or running) to existing friends.

But nutrients go down

Even though exercise is good for you, your body burns through your stores of nutrients faster than in people who are not active at all. Athletes often have nutrient deficiencies in iron and magnesium for this reason. (2,3) The reason you lose iron is because of sweating, footstrike haemolysis (basically this means every time your foot strikes the ground, the blood cells in your feet get damaged and you lose iron because of that) and you could be deficient because you don’t include the right vitamins and minerals in your diet. (2-4) Female athletes are also at risk because you lose blood every month and adolescents go through growth spurts which also eats through their nutrient stores faster, especially if they are active. (4-6)

When you eat a healthy balanced diet, you will consume all the vitamins and minerals you will need on a daily basis, but it isn’t always possible, so it might be a good idea to supplement your daily diet – especially if you are active or follow a restrictive diet. (3,6-8)

Multivitamin + Mineral Formulations

Foodstate has a Multivitamin + Mineral range in three different formulations, each aimed at helping you maintain good health:

Iron Plus Formula: Iron is necessary for the transporting of oxygen through your body and to form healthy red blood cells. Without enough iron you will feel tired and short of breath. (4,9)

Magnesium Complex: Magnesium is necessary for muscle and nerve function, and is required for energy production. (10)

Further Reading

References: 1. Mayo Clinic. Healthy Lifestyle & fitness. 7 benefits of exercise. [online] [cited 2017 Oct 6]. Available from: URL: https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/exercise/art-20048389?pg=2. 2. Peeling P, Dawson B, Goodman C, Landers G, Trinder D. Athletic induced iron deficiency: now insights into the role of inflammation, cytokines and hormones. Eur J Appl Physiol 2008;103:381-391. 3. Kass LS, Skinner P, Poeira F. A Pilot Study on the Effects of Magnesium Supplementation with High and Low Habitual Dietary Magnesium Intake on Resting and Recovery from Aerobic and Resistance Exercise and Systolic Blood Pressure. J Sports Sci Med 2013;12:144-150. 4. Alaunyte I, Stojceska V, Plunkett A. Iron and the female athlete: a review of dietary treatment methods for improving iron status and exercise performance. J Internat Soc Sports Nutr 2015;12:38-44. 5. MedlinePlus. Normal growth and development. [online] [cited 2017 Oct 2]. Available from: URL: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002456.htm6. Alton I. Iron Deficiency Anemia. Guidelines for Adolescent Nutrition Services. Chapter 9. 2005 [online] [cited 2011 May 11]. Available from: URL:  http://www.epi.umn.edu/let/pubs/img/adol_ch9.pdf. 7. NHS Choices. Vitamins and minerals. [online] 2017 Mar [cited 2017 Oct 4]. Available from: URL: http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/vitamins-minerals/Pages/vitamins-minerals.aspx. 8. Merck Manual Consumer Version. Vitamins and Minerals. Disorders of Nutrition. [online] [cited 2017 Oct 6]. Available from: URL: http://www.merckmanuals.com/en-pr/home/disorders-of-nutrition/overview-of-nutrition/vitamins-and-minerals. 9. Mayo Clinic. Iron deficiency anemia. Symptoms and causes. [online] [cited 2017 Oct 6]. Available from: URL: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/iron-deficiency-anemia/symptoms-causes/syc-20355034?p=1. 10.  National Institutes of Health. Magnesium – Health Professional Fact Sheet. [online] 2016 Feb [cited 2017 Oct 6]. Available from: URL: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/.